Church

Religious structures

St. Peter Claver Church

Previously known as the Ormond Place Church. Constructed in 1853 for Bedford Reformed Church. After a dispute with the Reformed Church led that congregation to abandon the project, the Central Congregational Church became first tenant. 

Second German Baptist Church

The northwest corner of Evergreen Avenue and Woodbine Street is believed to be the site of first house constructed in the New Bushwick Lotts, an area granted by Peter Stuyvesant to the residents of the village of Bushwick in 1661. The first house was erected here in about 1700, built by a man named Van Nuyse. The house and three lots (about 70 acres total) were purchased by Leffert Lefferts from William Van Nuyse of New Utrecht in 1724.

Transfiguration Church

Cornerstone laid in September 1889. The current structure replaced an older structure dating to about 1874 that was located to the east on Hooper Street. The old church was built with the intention of later being converted to a school, and therefore had beam pockets built into the walls for the installation of two new floors at a future date. (That church/school was later replaced with a new school.)

St. Peter's Episcopal Church

Congregation started in 1847, first worshiping on Powers Street (Third Avenue). Constructed in 1851 for St. Peter's Episcopal Church. The cornerstone for the church was laid in 1850 and the building opened for services in May, 1851. By 1856, St. Peter's had outgrown the building and began construction of a new church on State Street, near Bond. Between 1857 and 1863 the building was occupied by the First Reform Presbyterian Church. The building was sold to the Church of the Convenanters in 1860. In 1864, the Second United Presbyterian Church of Brooklyn acquired the building.

Bethlehem Lutheran Church (Swedish)

Congregation was organized in 1874 and originally located in the former Pacific Street Chapel of the First Presbyterian Church (301 Pacific Street). The congregation disbanded in 2007 and the property transferred to the Metropolitan New York Lutheran Synod, which subsequently sold off the properties. The church itself is now occupied by the Temple of Restoration, while the former rectory has been converted to residential use.

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