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Building

The two buildings at 316 and 318 South 5th Street1  (which were later renumbered to 318 and 320) were nearly identical to the rest of the buildings on the south side of North 5th between Marcy Avenue and Rodney Street.

Building

Real Estate Record lists this as two buildings on Grand Street, "ss, 80 w Bushwick av". The description would point to 806 and 808 Grand Street, however these are part of a larger row of Italianate buildings and 806 is only 25' wide. 812 Grand Street, which is only 38' west of Bushwick Avenue, is a 30' wide neo-Grec building of this period; 808 next door is also 30' wide, but appears to be part of the Italianate row.

Building

Block of 8 dwellings and stores, on the south side of Grand Street starting one building west of Leonard Street.

Article
I came across this photo posted in a local history group - the only information provided was the caption, "Leonard Street 1916". Based on the photo and caption, there was not a lot to go on. A stern gentleman - let's call him Nathan - standing in front of a rowhouse. Judging by the ironwork and windows, the buildings to the right appear to be 1850s transitional Italianate/Greek Revival. Nathan's building - based just on the ironwork (nothing else is visible) - is not part of the same development and is probably early 1840s. So where is this photo?
Building

Pair of transitional Greek Revival/Italianate stores and residences, probably circa 1850.

Building

Constructed in the early 1830s as a single-family residence. The original building was probably two-and-a-half stories and enlarged to three stories by the 1840s. As early as 1870, the building had been converted to multi-family use, with a Chinese laundry located in the basement. Other uses in the 19th century included an oyster bar. By the 1930s, the building was used for metal storage/salvage, as evidenced by the large metal shutters at the parlor floor level.

Building

A rare (and perhaps early?) non-ecclesiastical building designed by Thomas Houghton.

Place

Also called the "Gothic Church", the Second M. E. Church of Williamsburgh was organized on 4 September 1845 with ten members. The cornerstone for the church was laid on 4 December 1845 and the church was dedicated on 26 November 1846. The original trustees included Daniel Maujer, Lemuel Richardson, John F. Luther, Robert G. Thursby, Isaac Henderson and Charles Maujer.

Place

The Zion A. M. E. Church of Williamsburgh was organized in 1832 by Thomas Watson, in his house on Third (Berry) Street between North 4th and North 5th Streets. The church later rented rooms on North 4th Street between Third and Fourth Street (Berry and Bedford). The congregation numbered 12 members at this time, and retained Rev. John Churchill as its first regular preacher. Churchill also taught at the African Free School (later Colored School No. 3).

Place

Organized on 18 June 1842 and Incorporated in 1844. William Harden, a blind Black preacher was the first and only leader of the church. The first place of worship was in a rope walk, and after that burned the congregation met in private houses. After Harden's death in 1847, the congregation split up, with most of the worshippers moving over to the African M. E. Church on High Street.

Place

Organized in 1839 by a group of parishioners from Washington Street M. E. Church who were dissatisfied over the appointment of a preacher. Originally called the Centenary M. E. Church in honor of the centenary of Methodism in 1839, the congregation changed its name to the Johnson Street M. E. Church in 1868. The first church for the congregation was constructed in 1840 at a cost of $8,000.

Place

The first effort to organize the Dekalb Avenue M. E. Church began in the fall of 1836 with private services at the home of John Robb on Flushing Avenue near Classon Avenue. The first sermon was preached on 18 June 1837 in a school house on Classon Avenue, and the Sabbath school was established on the same date.