Bushwick Avenue Congregational Church

Currently occupied by the Bethesda Memorial Baptist Church, this building was constructed in 1894-96 for the Bushwick Avenue Congregational Church. The church was organized in 1887.

The church and parish house next door were designed by Fowler & Hough (AIA Guide incorrectly attributes the design of the church to Parfitt Brothers).

 

References:
"A New Brooklyn Church," New York Times, March 4, 1896.
"Dedicating a New Chapel," New York Times, December 12, 1887.
Ojito, Mirta. "Gutted Church in Brooklyn Will Be Rebuilt, Pastor Says," New York Times, December 21, 1997.
"Ready for Occupancy", New York Times, December 11, 1887.

Year
1896
Building type
Block
3373
Lot
36
Address

1162 Bushwick Avenue
11221 NY
United States

Owner name
Bushwick Avenue Congregational Church
Architect
Material
Notes

Sources: NY Times, March 4, 1896, DOB
Author: Asuka Ogawa
Architectural Style: Late Romanesque Revival Style (Church), Renaissance Revival Style (Parish house)

"The Bethesda Memorial Baptist Church occupies the edifice built from 1894-96 for the Bushwick Avenue Congregational Church, a society organized in 1887. Located on the northwest corner of Bushwick Avenue and Cornelia Street, the church was designed by [Fowler & Hough] in an inventive late-Romantic style, and features a slender, octagonal campanile surmounted by an open belfry. When built, the square auditorium provided accommodations for 750, and was naturally lighted by a clerestory of round arches. The interior trimmings were of oak, and the finish was in brown and amber shades.

At an unknown date, the building was acquired by the Bethesda Memorial Baptist Church. On December 20, 1997, the church sanctuary was gutted by a devastating fire that destroyed the interior. The church has since been rebuilt.
Renaissance Revival brown stone and brick parish house next door remains largely intact." (From NYC Organ Project)

AIA Guide to New York City describes the building as follows: "a powerful campanile corners this solid brick church, but the open belfry has been bricked in, destroying its original elegance. Take note of the Renaissance Revival brown stone and brick parish house next door."

Building Images
Rating
5

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