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  • "Charles Engert, the builder, will erect 36 two-story frame dwellings with brick basements, all improvements, 18*50 each, on Humboldt Street, both sides, between Driggs and Nassau Avenues, F. J. Berlenbach, Jr., architect."1

    Reference is to buildings on both side of the street, 637 to 663 Humboldt Street and 654 to 692 Humboldt Street.

  • Congregation Beth Jacob, S. Baum, rabbi, have determined to rebuild the synagogue on the east side of Keap near South 4th Street partly destroyed by lightning “some weeks ago”.1 In 1898 Hyde atlas, building appears as wood frame.

  • One of five neo-Grec brick row houses built by Daniel W.L. Moore, a local builder/developer. Design of the buildings is attributed to Frederick Weber.

    The two-story houses were originally designed with projecting square oriel windows with a modillioned cornice at the first floor and square-headed windows with corbeled sills and incised lintels at the second floor. 133 Calyer is missing its original oriel window but does retain most of its original ironwork.

  • One of five neo-Grec brick row houses built by Daniel W.L. Moore, a local builder/developer. Design of the buildings is attributed to Frederick Weber. Moore lived at 131 Calyer Street when the house was completed.

    The two-story houses were originally designed with projecting square oriel windows with a modillioned cornice at the first floor and square-headed windows with corbeled sills and incised lintels at the second floor. 131 Calyer is the only house in the row to retain the original oriel.

  • Calyer Street in Greenpoint was laid out in 1852. The street was named after Jacobus Calyer (died 1804 or 1766). The Calyer were one of five families who owned and farmed most of Greenpoint in the 18th and early 19th century. According to the Greenpoint Historic District designation report, Calyer Street ran through the northern section of the former Calyer farm. The Calyer farm, constituting about 65 acres, was located in this area until 1848.

  • Something got lost in the transcription of the caption for this postcard - St. Carontil, Dupan Street is actually St. Columbkille Church, Dupont Street in Greenpoint (even Eugene Arbruster got the name wrong, but he did get the address right). The Church was constructed around the turn of the 20th century as a chapel for residents and workers around Newtown Creek by St. Anthony of Padua parish. In 1939, Ss.

  • Ross Street Presbyterian Church was founded in 1864 by members of the South Third Street Presbyterian Church. Early supporters included Sylvester M. Beard, Eli Beard and Halsey Fitch.

  • The most distinctive feature of Teddy’s Bar at 96 Berry Street is the projecting wood and sheet-copper corner storefront with a beautiful decorative-glass transom reading “Peter Doelger’s Extra Beer”. Portions of the storefront were rebuilt after a car crashed into it about 10 years ago, but most of it – and all of the decorative glass - dates to at least 1907. That stained-glass transom is the source of much of the mythology that surrounds 96 Berry, tying it to a 19th-century beer baron and a 20th-century Hollywood icon.

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