Note: This is not a static site - entries are being updated continuously. New entries are listed immediately below, but check on the bottom of the page for recently updated entries.

Novelty Theater now includes information from the Bushwiki. Read more here.


 

New & Updated

  • Person

    Architect of St. Luke's German Evangelical Lutheran Church (1894), St. Mark's Protestant Episcopal Church, 222 Adelphi Street (Marshall & Walters, 1888), Memorial Presbyterain Church (Pugin & Walter, 1882-83), Chapel and Sunday School (Marshall & Walter, 1883), Seventh Avenue & St. John's Place.

  • Building

    First mass on the morning of August 4, 1889, in the second floor of the frame building at 1747 Fulton Street. Ground for the church was purchased in September, 1889, and in October the corner stone was laid by the late Bishop Laughlin.1Designed by Thomas F. Houghton.2

  • Person

    William Bunker Tubby (1858-1944) was a graduate of Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute in 1875. Tubby worked briefly in the office of Ebenezer Roberts, but by 1883 had established his own practice. Tubby worked extensively for the Pratt family, designing buildings for Pratt Institute and homes, garages and even mausolea for the family. Tubby also designed many private homes in Brooklyn Heights and elsewhere in the borough, as well as a police precinct and four of Brooklyn's Carnegie Libraries.

  • Person

    1872 - 1954. Born in Philadelphia and educated at Spring Garden Institute, the Franklin Institute and the Universtiy of Penssylvania. Perrot interned with with George Plowman and Charles C. Haines, after which he spent two years with Catholic church architect E. F. Durang. After leaving Durang's office, he went to work at Hales & Ballinger, architects and engineers. After Hales' retirement, Perrot joined the partnership, which became Ballinger & Perrot. Perrot left the partnership in 1920 to begin his own practice.

  • Person

    Partnership of Frank V. Laspia and Lee Samenfeld. Did a lot of work in sourthern Brooklyn, Bensonhurst in particular, in the 1920s and 1930s. Responsible for many tapestry brick buildings and alterations of older buildings in the 1920s tapestry brick style.

  • Person

    Partnership of Henry J. McGill and Talbot Hamlin

  • Person

    Named spelled McIntosh in some Brooklyn Eagle articles. Office (1912): 55 Bible House

  • Person

    Joseph F. Berlenbach, father of architect Francis J. Berlenbach, was listed as a carpenter in the 1872 Brooklyn city directory (at 174 Meserole Street). In the same year was listed as the architect of rectory for Holy Trinity Church on Montrose Avenue (as Joseph Berndach). The reference probably refers to his son. This is the only year that Joseph Berlenbach appears in the directory. In 1870, 1871 and 1873, Francis appears in the directories, with numerous name variations (Franz, Burlingbach, etc.).

Recent Articles

  • History of the…
  • Mae West Didn'…
  • St. Peter Claver…
  • Domino Sugar…
  • Congregation Ahavas…
  • Engelhardt's…
  • Williamsburg Bridge…
  • Astral Oil Works
  • Sts. Peter and Paul…
  • Historic Street…
  • Gandar's…
  • Mechanics &…