brick

133 Calyer Street

One of five neo-Grec brick row houses built by Daniel W.L. Moore, a local builder/developer. Design of the buildings is attributed to Frederick Weber.

The two-story houses were originally designed with projecting square oriel windows with a modillioned cornice at the first floor and square-headed windows with corbeled sills and incised lintels at the second floor. 133 Calyer is missing its original oriel window but does retain most of its original ironwork.

131 Calyer Street

One of five neo-Grec brick row houses built by Daniel W.L. Moore, a local builder/developer. Design of the buildings is attributed to Frederick Weber. Moore lived at 131 Calyer Street when the house was completed.

The two-story houses were originally designed with projecting square oriel windows with a modillioned cornice at the first floor and square-headed windows with corbeled sills and incised lintels at the second floor. 131 Calyer is the only house in the row to retain the original oriel.

96 Berry Street

Constructed in 1885 and designed by architect A. Herbert, this neo-Grec tenement has housed a bar (today Teddy's Bar) on its ground floor for over a century.

1118 Lorimer Street

Hugh Roberts was a local mason who developed these three buildings at the corner of Noble Street and Lorimer Street, as well as the buildings to the south on Lorimer and east on Noble. Architect in the Real Estate Record is listed as "E. J. E. and G. J. Roberts", perhaps a relation to Hugh Roberts; the Greenpoint Historic District designation report lists the architect as E. S. Evans. Evans is listed as the architect for other Roberts projects in the designation report. The Robertses cited in the Real Estate Record may be the builders.

151 Kent Avenue

Havemeyers & Elder first built a two-story warehouse on this site in 1874. In May of 1887, the building suffered a catastrophic fire. According to the Brooklyn Eagle, the building was used as a depot by the Erie Railroad, managed by L. M. Palmer, and owned and operated by Havemeyers & Elder. Soon after, Havemeyers & Elder rebuilt the building as a three-story warehouse.

194 Keep Street

Historical address is 184 Keep Street. No architect listed, but William T. Lamb is assumed.

Source: Real Estate Record & Builders' Guide (vol. 14, no 337, August 29, 1874), 146.

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