Northside

68 Grand Street Yorkton Sun, 06/26/2022 - 22:44

Constructed in the early 1830s as a single-family residence. The original building was probably two-and-a-half stories and enlarged to three stories by the 1840s. As early as 1870, the building had been converted to multi-family use, with a Chinese laundry located in the basement. Other uses in the 19th century included an oyster bar. By the 1930s, the building was used for metal storage/salvage, as evidenced by the large metal shutters at the parlor floor level.

146 Wythe Avenue Yorkton Tue, 06/14/2022 - 22:32

A rare (and perhaps early?) non-ecclesiastical building designed by Thomas Houghton.

79 Berry Street Yorkton Fri, 10/01/2021 - 22:50

Real Estate Record & Builders' Guide (v. 15, no. 368, April 3, 1875), 233.

226 North 5th Street Yorkton Fri, 10/01/2021 - 22:13

Listed in Real Estate Record as 224 North 5th. According to Bromley atlas, the property to the west (now 224) was 222 North 5th Street. Real Estate Record & Builders' Guide (v. 15, no. 367, March 27, 1875), 220.

North Fifth Street M. E. Church Yorkton Thu, 03/19/2015 - 11:54
Our Lady of Consolation R. C. Church Yorkton Mon, 12/24/2012 - 23:49

Parish was separated from St. Stanislaus Kostka's parish in 1909 as a separate Polish parish for Williamsburg. Prior to the erection of the church, mass was held at McCaddin Memorial Hall. The cornerstone of the church was laid on May 9, 19101 . The building combines a church and a school, with the basement used as a parish hall and a separate convent next door and rectory across Metropolitan Avenue.

St. Vincent de Paul R. C Church

Laying of the cornerstone attended by 10,000 people, let by Bishop Loughlin. Construction was "begun on the second day of June under the superintendence of Mr. P. C. Keeley [sic], architect, who numbers this as his three hundred and eighty fifth church edifice he has been engaged in building on this continent. Its dimensions are 68 feet in width by 156 feet in depth, and judging by the massive appearance of the walls, constructed by the builder, Mr. Jas. Radwell [sic, probably Rodwell, a prominent local builder], will be as substantial an edifice as any in the States.